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Articles and News Features

Community Karen Hockney

Mimosa Mougins Ball 2017 in aid of cancer

When a group of expat residents decided to establish Mimosa Matters to help fight cancer on the Cote d’Azur, little did they realise just how dramatic an impact their association would have. Four years on, Mimosa has raised in excess of €140,000 through their events – two charity balls in Mougins, a cocktail party on the beach in Cannes and two Nice Marathon teams, the last of which numbered over 170 runners in the 2016…
Expat Issues Orjan Pettersen

Today, the ultra-hard Tory Brexit will be in motion

It is better to be slapped with the truth than kissed with a lie. If you support a Tory agenda of privatisation of the NHS, reduction of consumer, employee and environmental protections and a tax haven for corporations but a bigger tax burden for ordinary tax payers, you can now rejoice. Congratulations. You are a winner. If you don’t, but you’re still a Leaver (or a Remainer) you are in for the biggest high risk national…

Today is Article 50 day. What now for expat healthcare?

Expat Issues Mike Meade
It’ll be a 2 year wait to know for sure what the consequences of the March 29 Article 50 letter will mean in reality for…

Secret language of cypress trees in Provence

Slender, conical cypress trees are everywhere in Provence: they line roads, outline fields, decorate cemeteries, and…

The Virgin project of Nice: the statue that never came to be

Did you know that the city of Nice almost had a 49 foot (15 metre) tall statue of the Virgin Mary standing atop the…

5 Jean Cocteau treasures on the Riviera

Culture and Arts Margo Lestz
Jean Cocteau was truly a multi-talented artist. He considered himself a poet but he was also a novelist, playwright,…

A step-by-step guide to becoming a freelancer

Despite the French government embracing digital technology to reduce the form-filling burden, paperwork is a way of life…

Wine: Thoughts on 2015 Bordeaux En Primeur

Table Talk Alex Ignatieff
Fantastic! Finally, a year in Bordeaux to really get excited about. This may not be the biggest news of the day as the…

Tracing the 1,000-mile odyssey of D.H. Lawrence’s phoenix headstone

History and Traditions Robert Bullock
Soon after D. H.Lawrence’s burial in Vence Cemetery on March 4th, 1930, his widow Frieda commissioned a simple headstone…

On y va! Hiking though the Alpes-Maritimes by train

Visiting the Riviera Portia Griffey
I have lived in Nice for the past few years, learning French as I go, as I didn’t speak a word when I arrived. Through…

French Riviera: Information, News, Facts. Life on the Cote d'Azur - Riviera Reporter

So what is new in 2013?

A flurry of cold, depressing bad news, like the weather. Almost comical stories of the wealthy leaving France to avoid the 75% tax on high incomes (over €1M), before the Constitutional Court overturned the measure early in the New Year. Will Gérard Depardieu and his pals return? Unlikely. To quote one of France’s leading actors: “I am leaving because you consider that success, creation, talent, in fact anything that is different, should be penalised.” So said Depardieu in response to Prime Minister Ayrault’s opinion of him being “pathetic” for taking tax residency in Belgium (this was before Depardieu’s Russian foray).

President Hollande seems not to care about the Constitutional Court and has vowed to drive through some other tax on the higher earners: “We will always ask for more from those that have the most,” he declared.

Bernard ArnaultAnother personality to arouse controversy was Bernard Arnault (pictured), Chief Executive of the luxury goods group, LVMH, who is also moving to Belgium. In attempting to gain Belgian citizenship, could France’s richest man be paving a way to enter the tax haven of Monaco by the “back door”? Rich French people often switch nationality before heading to the Mediterranean It all looks shoddy for France’s image to the outside world, coming hard on the heels of the spat with the Indian aluminium giant, ArcelorMittal. Before Christmas, ArcelorMittal had announced the closure of its plant at Florange in July 2012, giving a deadline of the end of the year for prospective suitors to come forward with offers to take the plant over. No one was forthcoming and there was even talk of nationalising the plant. The whole world stood back in shock at the affront on private enterprise. Eventually the French government was obliged to stand aside and allow economic forces to dictate and private business to make its own tough decisions (and let’s not forget that Mr Mittal still employs over 20,000 people in France even with the loss of 600 at Florange).

One solitary bit of good news, which might have escaped the attention of most, was the settlement early in the year between employer and employee unions on means to “fluidify” the conditions of hiring and firing, allocating employees to parts of the economy that are actually working, rather than hanging onto them at places (like Florange) where things definitely are not. Employers have been saying for ages that they need to be able to take employees on under short-term contracts, rather than the kind of “jobs for life” that many French people assume is a God-given right. Employers also need to be able to act quickly and decisively, so if things have stopped working economically they can make staff redundant without protracted disputes with the unions. This “fluidifying” of the conditions of employment should eventually feed through into the unemployment figures, as structurally there will be more incentive to hire staff in the sectors of the economy that are coming out of the recession.

Unemployment is currently running at just over 12% and looks likely to worsen over the next 12 months with PSA, Renault, Virgin Megastores, as some of the big names making swathing cuts to their workforce. Plus ça change – as we enter 2013 – plus c’est la même chose!

Photo: nicogenin